Wilder on the Taylor: Fishing Report – June 2013

Rainbow Trout at Wilder on the Taylor

Net full of Rainbow- This 6 lb Rainbow was recently taken in the river on size 20 Blue Winged Olive nymph.

June 9, 2013 – While Western Colorado struggles with difficult fishing conditions due to peak spring flows, fishing at Wilder on the Taylor is fantastic, with stable flows and clear water. With summer just around the corner, warmer water temperatures on the horizon, and hatches of Blue Wing Olives on cloudy days – afternoons on the river have been the best time for fishing.

Otherwise, the river is fishing well with a number of droppers set up, including pheasant tails, small mayflies, and larger stoneflies fished deep in the runs. Over the coming weeks we expect the dry fly fishing to improve immensely, with more consistent daily hatches of caddis, mayfly, and stonefly.

Rarick Creek is fishing very well on the surface, with small mayfly hatches occurring throughout the day. A well-presented small dry, such as a Parachute Adams, is a great option to hook one of the large rainbows you’re sure to see swimming through the water.

The hatches on the pond have been quite good as well, with fish rising to midges in the mornings and small mayflies throughout the afternoons and evenings. The best bet is to spot a feeding fish and cast your fly towards where they will be swimming. Hoppers are already getting big and active, so it won’t be long before the fish start looking for large bugs on the surface.

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Rarick Creek a Fly-Fishing Gem at Wilder on the Taylor

Rarick Creek at Wilder Colorado imageThe Taylor River may be the best-known stretch of water at Wilder on the Taylor in the Gunnison-Crested Butte Valley, but Rarick Creek also has been receiving rave reviews. Developed in a detention area where the original Rarick Creek ran through the property years ago, three miles of meandering stream was reconstructed by Matt Weaver of Bozeman, Montana-based Five Rivers Restoration and completed in 2009.

Located in the meadow behind the owners’ cabins, the creek has developed into its own self-sustaining ecosystem with the trout reproducing and wintering safely. “It’s a habitat that fish like,” says Jackson-Shaw Vice President Ron Welborn. “We just enhanced what Mother Nature created before the property was a ranch years ago.”

The original creek didn’t disappear; it runs along the north side of the ranch and delivers vital water to the hay meadow when the snowmelt makes it way down the mountains. The reintroduced stretch offers excellent sight-fishing opportunities and is an ideal option when people want to fly-fish without wading, get out for a few casts before dinner and develop confidence in the sport.

When discussing Rarick Creek, Weaver notes that it’s “the best expression of my work in creating new waters for comfortable and challenging fly-fishing that I have done yet.”

Rarick Creek at Wilder-on-the-Taylor image

Rarick Creek at Wilder-on-the-Taylor image

Rarick Creek at Wilder on the Taylor image

Rarick Creek at Wilder on the Taylor image

Rarick Creek at Wilder on the Taylor image

Rarick Creek at Wilder on the Taylor image

Rarick Creek at Wilder on the Taylor image

Rarick Creek at Wilder on the Taylor image

 

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